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Deciduous Shrubs

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Deciduous Shrubs

Serviceberry

Serviceberry

Richard Webb, Self-empolyed horticulturist, Bugwood.org [Click here to view full size picture]
Richard Webb, Self-empolyed horticulturist, Bugwood.org

Serviceberry

Richard Webb, Self-empolyed horticulturist, Bugwood.org [Click here to view full size picture]
Richard Webb, Self-empolyed horticulturist, Bugwood.org

Serviceberry (Juneberry), Amelanchier canadensis: Native shrub or small tree growing 10-25' tall. Flowers are white with bright green foliage. Berries are relished by grouse and various songbirds. Does well in dry to moist soils with full sun, though it will tolerate some shade.

Highbush Cranberry

 Rob Routledge, Sault College, Bugwood.org [Click here to view full size picture]
Rob Routledge, Sault College, Bugwood.org

Highbush Cranberry, Viburnum trilobum: Native shrub growing up to 12 tall. Produces clusters of white flowers with bright scarlet berries in the fall. Performs well in a broad range of soil types and will tolerate a high degree of shade once established. Excellent winter food for ruffed grouse.

Chokecherry

Paul Wray, Iowa State University, Bugwood.org [Click here to view full size picture]
Paul Wray, Iowa State University, Bugwood.org

Chokecherry, Prunus virginiana: Native shrub growing 13-20' tall. Dense clusters of white flowers are followed by red fruit ripening to dark purple in late summer. Widely regarded as an important wildlife food plant and provides habitat, watershed protection, and species diversity. Does best in sandy/loam and poor soils.

Staghorn Sumac

USDA-NRCS Plants Database, Herman D.E., et al., 1996. North Dakota tree handbook, USDA NRCS ND State Soil Conservation Committee, NDSU Extension and Western Area Power Administration, Bismarck  [Click here to view full size picture]
USDA-NRCS Plants Database, Herman D.E., et al., 1996. North Dakota tree handbook, USDA NRCS ND State Soil Conservation Committee, NDSU Extension and Western Area Power Administration, Bismarck

Staghorn Sumac, Rhus typhina: Native shrub growing up to 20 tall. Develops clusters of scarlet berries that are an excellent winter food for wildlife. Has a wide spreading root system which makes it a good plant for soil stabilization. Prefers dry to moist, infertile soils with full sun.

Common Lilac

 Joseph Berger, Bugwood.org [Click here to view full size picture]
Joseph Berger, Bugwood.org

Lilac, Syringa vulgaris:Fast-growing shrub reaching a height over 15. Makes a nice screen in 3 to 4 years when planted 6 to 8 apart or can be trimmed as a hedge. Does best in well-drained silty, clay, or loamy soils in full sun. Produces large, fragrant, lilac flowers in mid-Spring.

Red Osier Dogwood

Bill Cook, Michigan State University, Bugwood.org [Click here to view full size picture]
Bill Cook, Michigan State University, Bugwood.org

Red Osier Dogwood, Cornus stolonifera: Native shrub growing up to 10'tall. Showy, red to purplish branches with whitish berries. Leaves are oblong with pointed tips and turn dark red in the fall. Prefers moist soils with full sun. Excellent food for wildlife, the dogwood is a must for winter interest in the garden.

Nannyberry

Richard Webb, Self-employed horticulturist, Bugwood.org [Click here to view full size picture]
Richard Webb, Self-employed horticulturist, Bugwood.org

Nannyberry, Viburnum lentago: Large, native, hardwood shrub growing up to 25' tall. Prefers moist, well drained soils but is adaptable to poorly drained soils. Grows in both shade and sun. A favorite winter food for wildlife.

Pussy Willow

Iowa State University Extension [Click here to view full size picture]
Iowa State University Extension

Pussy Willow, Salix discolor: Wetland shrub or small tree growing up to 20' tall. Ideal for areas of landscape suffering from poor drainage. Grows best in full sun and produces furry catkins/cylindrical flower clusters in early spring which can be used for decoration when pruned back. Interesting foliage color into the fall.

Beaked Hazelnut

Dave Powell, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org [Click here to view full size picture]
Dave Powell, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org

Beaked Hazelnut, Coylus cornuta: Medium-sized shrub reaching up to 12' high. Flowers in April to May and produces flavorful nuts in early fall. Prefers open sites in hardwood forests or along forest edges. Creates a nice screen when fully grown. Excellent for wildlife.

American Hazelnut

Richard Webb, Self-employed horticulurist, Bugwood.org [Click here to view full size picture]
Richard Webb, Self-employed horticulurist, Bugwood.org

American Hazelnut, Corylus americana: A dense, thicket-forming shrub reaching up to 12' in height. Yellowish-brown catkins are showy in late winter and early spring. Fall color varies from bright yellow to deep wine-red. Edible nuts eaten by birds and squirrels. Prefers moist to dry, well-drained soils in shade to partial shade.

This page last updated on 2/10/2014.